Lindsay V. Knight, DMD
& Associates, PC
407 N. Main Street
Doylestown, PA 18901
Directions
(215) 348-1192
Hours

Exceptional Quality Dental Care Performed with Compassion

Post Operative Instructions

Composite (Tooth Colored) Fillings:

Do I have to be careful with my new filling?

Tooth colored, or composite fillings are completely hardened once they have been placed. You may eat as soon as the numbness from the anesthetic subsides in order to avoid damage to your tongue or lips.

What if my filling hurts?

No matter how big or small, a composite filling can have temperature or pressure sensitivity. For instance, if you were to eat ice cream, drink hot tea, or bite on something hard, you may experience a temporary sensation of sensitivity on the tooth that was recently filled. That is OK! It will usually go away within a week; however, it could take a month or two for the sensitivity to subside.

What if my gums are sore?

It is normal for your gum tissue around the tooth or the injection site to be sore. Dissolve a teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water and gently rinse and spit out the salt water. Continue this 3 or 4 times a day until the gum soreness goes away.

What if something feels 'different'?

If your filling feels high or your bite feels uneven when all the numbness wears away, call us right away so that we may simply adjust the filling. We make every attempt to make sure everything feels perfect before you leave, however it is sometimes difficult when you are still numb.

Your new filling may be contoured differently or have a different texture from your original tooth. Your mouth and tongue should become accustomed to this in a few days.

Endodontics (Root Canal) Treatment:

What if my tooth hurts after my root canal?

Remember: Root canal is a minor surgery and some degree of post operative sensitivity or pain is to be expected. The level of discomfort you experience may depend on the extent of infection in your tooth and other variables. We take every precaution to make your treatment as pleasant as possible and any discomfort should subside gradually.p>

Some slight swelling may also occur.

Always take the medications that have been prescribed for you exactly the way they are prescribed.

Moderate pain: Over the counter pain medications like Advil, Tylenol or Aleve are usually sufficient.

Severe pain: Prescription pain medications can be indicated

What if my gums are sore?

It is normal for your gum tissue around the tooth or the injection site to be sore. Dissolve a teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water, and gently rinse and spit out the salt water. Continue this 3 or 4 times a day until the gum soreness goes away.

What is my 'temporary filling'?

A temporary filling is placed in your tooth to fill the access hole that was used to perform the root canal treatment. Do not eat for 2 hours after your appointment is concluded and avoid chewing directly on the temporary filling until it can be replaced by a permanent filling or a crown. Also, please take care not to eat until the numbness from the anesthetic subsides in order to avoid damage to your tongue or lips.

You must follow up with the placement of your permanent filling or crown as you have been advised. Any unnecessary delay in the placement of a final restoration may lead to a re-infection of the tooth or permanent damage of the remaining tooth structure and the tooth may not be able to be saved.

TEMPORARY Crowns/Inlays/Onlays/Bridges:

How many appointments will this take?

Typically, any type of crown/inlay/onlay/bridge will require 2 or 3 appointments to complete.

What is my 'temporary'?

Your temporary is made of a plastic type material. It is made to protect your teeth and gums while a custom restoration is being fabricated for you at a dental laboratory. Temporary cement is used so that your temporary restoration will be easy to remove when the permanent crown/inlay/onlay/bridge is ready.

What do I do if my temporary comes off?

Call the office right away to schedule an appointment to cement it back into place. It is vital for the proper fit of your final restoration that your temporary stays in place.

How should I care for my temporary?

Even though temporaries are made of a strong material, you must be careful because it can break if too much pressure is placed on it.

Avoid sticky, chewy or hard foods (ex: gum, caramel, ice cubes)

Chew on the opposite side if possible

Brush and floss daily around your temporary, but pull the floss down in between your teeth and then out the side. Do not pull the floss back up in a snapping motion.

What if my temporary hurts?

It is normal to experience some sensitivity to temperature or pressure following any restoration, but it generally subsides within a week or so. Temporary restorations are not like the permanent. So please try to bear with them in the interim.

What if my gums are sore?

It is normal for your gum tissue around the tooth or the injection site to be sore. Dissolve a teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water, and gently rinse and spit out the salt water. Continue this 3 or 4 times a day until the gum soreness goes away.

What if something feels 'different'?

If your temporary feels high or your bite feels uneven when all the numbness wears away, call us right away so that we may simply adjust it. We make every attempt to make sure everything feels perfect before you leave, however it is sometimes difficult when you are still numb.

Your temporary may be contoured differently or have a different texture from your original tooth. Your mouth and tongue should become accustomed to this in a few days.

Crowns/Inlays/Onlays/Bridges:

How should I care for my crown/inlay/onlay/bridge?

For the first 24 HOURS you must be careful with your new restoration while the permanent cement is setting.

For the first 24 HOURS:

Avoid sticky, chewy or hard foods (ex: gum, caramel, ice cubes)

Chew on the opposite side if possible

Brush and floss around your permanent restoration, but pull the floss down in between your teeth and then out the side. Do not pull the floss back up in a snapping motion.

What if my crown/inlay/onlay/bridge hurts?

It is normal to experience some sensitivity to temperature or pressure following any restoration, but it generally subsides within a week or so.

What if my gums are sore?

It is normal for your gum tissue around the tooth or the injection site to be sore. Dissolve a teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water and gently rinse and spit out the salt water. Continue this 3 or 4 times a day until the gum soreness goes away.

What if something feels 'different'?

If your restoration feels high or your bite feels uneven when all the numbness wears away, if you were numb, call us right away so that we may simply adjust it. We make every attempt to make sure everything feels perfect before you leave, however it is sometimes difficult when you are still numb.

Your restoration may be contoured differently or have a different texture from your original tooth. Your mouth and tongue should become accustomed to this in a few days.

Your restoration may feel 'tight' for a few days. This is normal and will subside quickly.